CUBAN CINEMA AT THE ANNUAL CANNES FILM FESTIVAL

Repeating Islands

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A post by Peter Jordens.

With the 70th Cannes Film Festival currently taking place (May 17-28), here is a partial overview of the presence at that annual festival of films from/about Cuba, which country probably has the Caribbean region’s most vital cinematic tradition.

As mentioned in our recent post, the classic Lucía (by Humberto Solás, originally released in 1968) is being screened in the ‘Cannes Classics’ section this year (2017), while Memorias del subdesarrollo (by Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, also from 1968) was included in that category in 2016. https://repeatingislands.com/2017/05/19/lucia-emblematic-cuban-film-in-cannes-film-festival

In 2015, Anfibio (by Héctor Silva Núñez, a Venezuelan student at the Escuela Internacional de Cine y Televisión in Cuba) was included in the ‘Cinéfondation’ section, comprising a selection of 18 short movies by students from film schools around the world. Source: https://entretenimiento.terra.cl/cultura/argentina-cuba-chile-y-espana-a-cannes,2473b7ac7ecbc410VgnCLD200000b2bf46d0RCRD.html

In 2014, the ‘Short Film Corner’ at Cannes presented two Cuban films: La muerte del…

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‘Cuba is already ours’: annexationists, filibusterers, & the US struggle to buy Cuba, 1820-1898

Dr Carrie Gibson, author of Empire's Crossroads, which I reviewed here, recently gave a paper at UCL in London on the US's many attempts to buy Cuba from Spain throughout the nineteenth century. The paper is packed with information about nineteenth-century Cuba, and the various parties vying for power and influence there. Dr Gibson sets the... Continue Reading →

#CubanRevolutionSyllabus Introduction

Age of Revolutions

By Michael J. Bustamante

The Cuban Revolution receives as much media and popular attention as any event in Latin American history. Yet as Jennifer Lambe and I argue in a forthcoming essay, the field of Cuban revolutionary history is at once saturated and, paradoxically, “underdeveloped.” Friends, critics, and academic observers of the Cuban “process” have churned out decades’ worth of analyses. Still, fifty-eight years after the barbudos triumphantly entered Havana, our understanding of what actually transpired over the following decades continues to be limited by the vagaries of archival access, a predominant focus on high politics and international relations, and enduring political polarization.

There is little agreement, even, on when the timeline of inquiry should start and end. For supporters, the Cuban Revolution is ongoing and eternal, dating as far back to Cuba’s independence movement in the nineteenth century. For opponents, the Revolution’s hopes proved terminal long ago. 1959, 1961…

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