Review: Marisa Fuentes, DISPOSSESSED LIVES

Professor Park's Blog

Sometimes the best thing a book can do is make you feel guilty. That is certainly the case with the book I’m gisting today.

There were more enslaved women in the colonial port town of Bridgetown, found on the western edge of Barbados, than any other demographic group. So why do they receive such little attention? Marisa J. Fuentes, in her provocative bookDispossessed Lives: Enslaved Women, Violence, and the Archive (UPenn Press, 2016), argues that the traditional archive was constructed in such a way to inflict perpetual violence upon women. Until that narrative is disrupted, historians continue to partake in this original sin. Fuentes’s book is, she explains, an attempt at “redress” (12). Dispossessed Livesfollows the stories of a handful of women in the eighteenth century through the lens of documents that only peripherally mention them: a runaway named Jane, a mulatto brothel, an enslaved woman who was…

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Hilary McD. Beckles: the legacy of slavery in Barbados

Black Perspectives, the blog of the African American Intellectual History Society, has published an excerpt from the preface to Professor Beckles's most recent book: The First Black Slave Society: Britain's "Barbarity Time" in Barbados, 1636—1876.  In the book, Beckles explores the brutal course of Barbados's history, and argues that the distinct social character and cultural identity of... Continue Reading →

Britain’s Forgotten Slave Owners: BBC’s award-winning TV series

In 2015, the BBC in Britain screened Britain's Forgotten Slave Owners, a 2-part documentary series, presented by David Olusoga. The series won a BAFTA TV award in the 'Specialist Factual' category in 2016.  The documentary was produced in conjunction with the team at University College London who created the Legacies of British Slave Ownership database. This... Continue Reading →

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