CUBAN CINEMA AT THE ANNUAL CANNES FILM FESTIVAL

Repeating Islands

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A post by Peter Jordens.

With the 70th Cannes Film Festival currently taking place (May 17-28), here is a partial overview of the presence at that annual festival of films from/about Cuba, which country probably has the Caribbean region’s most vital cinematic tradition.

As mentioned in our recent post, the classic Lucía (by Humberto Solás, originally released in 1968) is being screened in the ‘Cannes Classics’ section this year (2017), while Memorias del subdesarrollo (by Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, also from 1968) was included in that category in 2016. https://repeatingislands.com/2017/05/19/lucia-emblematic-cuban-film-in-cannes-film-festival

In 2015, Anfibio (by Héctor Silva Núñez, a Venezuelan student at the Escuela Internacional de Cine y Televisión in Cuba) was included in the ‘Cinéfondation’ section, comprising a selection of 18 short movies by students from film schools around the world. Source: https://entretenimiento.terra.cl/cultura/argentina-cuba-chile-y-espana-a-cannes,2473b7ac7ecbc410VgnCLD200000b2bf46d0RCRD.html

In 2014, the ‘Short Film Corner’ at Cannes presented two Cuban films: La muerte del…

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Good Luck at Cannes 1745!

The short film 1745 An Untold Story of Slavery had its first screening last week in Edinburgh for cast, crew and supporters, and soon they are off to Cannes.  The film highlights a forgotten part of Scotland’s history: while Scotland was fighting for its national freedom in that fateful year, its economy was in large part founded... Continue Reading →

Conference Roundup: ‘Rethinking Caribbean Emancipations’

On Friday, April 21, 2017, several dozen scholars met at Duke University’s Franklin Humanities Institute for a one-day conference entitled, “In Freedom’s Name: Rethinking Caribbean Emancipations.” Organized by two Duke history graduate students, Michael Becker and Kristina Williams, with their faculty advisor, Barry Gaspar, the conference hosted three panels featuring ten preeminent scholars of the... Continue Reading →

Association of Caribbean Historians Annual Meeting

This is a link to the programme for the annual meeting of the Association of Caribbean Historians, which is happening in Tobago this week. Sadly I'm not in Tobago, so this is the closest I get to the ACH, but the programme gives an indication of the broad scope of historical work being done on the... Continue Reading →

Conference: Memory, Migration & Decolonisation in the Caribbean & Beyond, 1804 to the present

Registration is now open for this conference, to be held at Senate House, London, on 23 and 24 May this year. The programme is varied, and encompasses academic presentations, 'roundtable' discussions, and practical workshop sessions. For example, there's a workshop entitled 'Creating Memoirs and Recording Experience' which will focus on how to produce podcasts and write... Continue Reading →

“The Paradise of the World:” conflict and society in the Caribbean

While doing some background research on the indigenous people of St.Vincent, I came across a great online exhibition on the King's College London website. "The Paradise of the World:" conflict and society in the Caribbean" was originally held at KCL in 2011, but is now available as an online exhibition. This is such a great... Continue Reading →

Slavery, Freedom and the Jamaican Landscape | British Library – Picturing Places

The link below will take you to an article written by Miles Ogborn, Professor of Geography at Queen Mary University of London. Jamaican Maroons fought two major wars against the British during the 18th century. With reference to maps and views in the King's Topographical Collection, Miles Ogborn investigates this community of escaped slaves and... Continue Reading →

Voyages: The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database gets some updates & additional features

The Voyages Database as we know it today—an open-access website—was launched in the mid-2000s, after initially being released as a subscription-based CD-ROM. Voyages comprises more than 35,000 individual slaving expeditions between 1514 and 1866. The records provide information about vessels, enslaved peoples, slave traders and owners, and trading routes. The Voyages team have recently developed some new features,... Continue Reading →

‘Driver, cold morning:’ A Jamaican sketch by William Berryman

I've mentioned before the Legacies of British Slave Ownership project at University College London, which has been useful for my research. I came across this beautiful sketch on the project's website under the 'documents of interest' section. According to the LBSO research, William Berryman was an English artist who lived in Jamaica between 1808 and... Continue Reading →

Call for Papers – #Caribbean In/Securities and Creativity: #Diasporic Dialogues

Another conference! This one in London, 25-26 June.

Caribbean In/Securities: Creativity and Negotiation in the Caribbean (CARISCC)

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Caribbean In/Securities and Creativity: Diasporic Dialogues

Sunday 25 and Monday 26 June, 2017

Venue: The Knowledge Centre, British Library, London

REVISED DEADLINE : May 5, 2017

Following our diaspora-focused conference in 2016, this year’s two-day event will include a conference and an art and research exhibition speaking to the theme of Caribbean and diasporic dialogues where the role of creativity is highlighted in negotiating the in/securities permeating such dialogues. The event is a result of collaboration between the Centre for Caribbean and Diaspora Studies (CCDS) at Goldsmiths, University of London, and Caribbean In/Securities: Creativity and Negotiation in the Caribbean (CARISCC), an international research network funded by the Leverhulme Trust and seeking to explore interactions between the precariousness of insecure livelihoods and neighbourhoods, and the negotiation of risk through creativity, in a Caribbean context. CARISCC deploys the term ‘in/securities’ to foreground the interplay between security and insecurity as negotiated and shaped…

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Seeking PhD Students: ‘Caribbean literary heritage’ project

Repeating Islands

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A new research project funded by the Leverhulme Trust on Caribbean literary heritage is looking for collaborations with authors, researchers and archivists.

The Anglophone Caribbean’s reputation for outstanding creative writers has established itself globally since the late twentieth century, most prominently with St Lucian Derek Walcott’s Nobel Prize for Literature in 1992 and Trinidadian V. S. Naipaul’s just short of a decade later, in 2001. More recently still, a cluster of major international prizes has confirmed the extraordinary standing of Caribbean-born writers on the world literary stage. The prestigious Forward Prize for Poetry was awarded to Jamaican Kei Miller in 2014, Jamaican-born Claudia Rankine in 2015 and Trinidadian Vahni Capildeo in 2016. In 2015 a Caribbean writer – Jamaican Marlon James – also won the coveted Man Booker Prize. Such accolades speak of individual talents but they also intimate something of a regional context for literary innovation and excellence. Despite…

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Hilary McD. Beckles: the legacy of slavery in Barbados

Black Perspectives, the blog of the African American Intellectual History Society, has published an excerpt from the preface to Professor Beckles's most recent book: The First Black Slave Society: Britain's "Barbarity Time" in Barbados, 1636—1876.  In the book, Beckles explores the brutal course of Barbados's history, and argues that the distinct social character and cultural identity of... Continue Reading →

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