Making the Haitian Revolution in early America: Podcast

In this episode of Ben Franklin's World, Liz Covart interviews James Alexander Dun, the author of Dangerous Neighbours. In the episode, Dun explores how the Haitian Revolution shaped the way Americans thought about their own revolution. The discussion begins with one of the best summaries of the Haitian Revolution I've ever heard (or read), which... Continue Reading →

Symposium—Collaborating across the Divide: Digital Humanities and the Caribbean

Repeating Islands

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The symposium “Collaborating across the Divide: Digital Humanities and the Caribbean” will take place September 21-22, 2017, at the University of Florida (in Gainesville, Florida). We’re hoping that folks involved in Caribbean Studies from around the region might be able to attend, with this event both focusing on and being an opportunity for facilitating collaborations. All events are free and open to the public and will take place in the Smathers Library, room 100.

Description: Digital technology has made the early twenty-first century a critical moment of opportunity by providing access to a wide range of library and archival materials and by offering new means of teaching, analyzing content, and presenting literary scholarship. While digital technologies have the promise of bridging institutional and geographic barriers, they have also continued to reproduce colonial hierarchies and marginalize content from the Caribbean and the Global South. This symposium, “Collaborating Across the Divide: Digital…

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1745. Runaway Slaves in Scotland: cast & crew interview

Episode 199 of The Outlander Podcast is an interview with the cast and production team for 1745. I wrote about this film in an earlier post. That post also has links to the work of a team of historians at the University of Glasgow investigating runaway slaves in Scotland. The podcast interview is well worth a listen.... Continue Reading →

Framing Slavery in Eighteenth-Century French Portraiture at the Château des Ducs de Bretagne

This is an excellent article about the way that the curators at the Musée de l’Histoire de Nantes have displayed the portraits of Dominique and Marguerite Deurbroucq—and in particular, the way that the curators draw museum-goers’ attention to the enslaved Africans depicted in the portraits.

Age of Revolutions

By Nathan H. Dize

In May 2015, theMusée de l’Histoire de Nantes welcomed two of their most influential citizens of the eighteenth century to their permanent collection. The museum, housed in the Château des Ducs de Bretagne, received two portraits – one of Dominique Deurbroucq and the other of his wife Marguerite – both of which feature prominently in the main exhibition on Atlantic slavery and the slave trade in Nantes. Painted in 1753 by Pierre-Bernard Morlot, the Deurbroucqs are portrayed in all of the luxe of the century, accompanied by their domestic slaves who lived with them in Nantes.  I recently visited the collection and was particularly interested in the framing of these two portraits within the narrative of the tran-Atlantic slave trade and the history of Nantes.

Screen Shot 2017-05-21 at 10.55.21 AM Pierre-Bernard Morlot, Portraits des Deurbroucq, 1753. (Photo credit to Nathan H. Dize)

For museums, memorial sites, and monuments, context…

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CUBAN CINEMA AT THE ANNUAL CANNES FILM FESTIVAL

Repeating Islands

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A post by Peter Jordens.

With the 70th Cannes Film Festival currently taking place (May 17-28), here is a partial overview of the presence at that annual festival of films from/about Cuba, which country probably has the Caribbean region’s most vital cinematic tradition.

As mentioned in our recent post, the classic Lucía (by Humberto Solás, originally released in 1968) is being screened in the ‘Cannes Classics’ section this year (2017), while Memorias del subdesarrollo (by Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, also from 1968) was included in that category in 2016. https://repeatingislands.com/2017/05/19/lucia-emblematic-cuban-film-in-cannes-film-festival

In 2015, Anfibio (by Héctor Silva Núñez, a Venezuelan student at the Escuela Internacional de Cine y Televisión in Cuba) was included in the ‘Cinéfondation’ section, comprising a selection of 18 short movies by students from film schools around the world. Source: https://entretenimiento.terra.cl/cultura/argentina-cuba-chile-y-espana-a-cannes,2473b7ac7ecbc410VgnCLD200000b2bf46d0RCRD.html

In 2014, the ‘Short Film Corner’ at Cannes presented two Cuban films: La muerte del…

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Good Luck at Cannes 1745!

The short film 1745 An Untold Story of Slavery had its first screening last week in Edinburgh for cast, crew and supporters, and soon they are off to Cannes.  The film highlights a forgotten part of Scotland’s history: while Scotland was fighting for its national freedom in that fateful year, its economy was in large part founded... Continue Reading →

Conference Roundup: ‘Rethinking Caribbean Emancipations’

On Friday, April 21, 2017, several dozen scholars met at Duke University’s Franklin Humanities Institute for a one-day conference entitled, “In Freedom’s Name: Rethinking Caribbean Emancipations.” Organized by two Duke history graduate students, Michael Becker and Kristina Williams, with their faculty advisor, Barry Gaspar, the conference hosted three panels featuring ten preeminent scholars of the... Continue Reading →

Association of Caribbean Historians Annual Meeting

This is a link to the programme for the annual meeting of the Association of Caribbean Historians, which is happening in Tobago this week. Sadly I'm not in Tobago, so this is the closest I get to the ACH, but the programme gives an indication of the broad scope of historical work being done on the... Continue Reading →

Conference: Memory, Migration & Decolonisation in the Caribbean & Beyond, 1804 to the present

Registration is now open for this conference, to be held at Senate House, London, on 23 and 24 May this year. The programme is varied, and encompasses academic presentations, 'roundtable' discussions, and practical workshop sessions. For example, there's a workshop entitled 'Creating Memoirs and Recording Experience' which will focus on how to produce podcasts and write... Continue Reading →

“The Paradise of the World:” conflict and society in the Caribbean

While doing some background research on the indigenous people of St.Vincent, I came across a great online exhibition on the King's College London website. "The Paradise of the World:" conflict and society in the Caribbean" was originally held at KCL in 2011, but is now available as an online exhibition. This is such a great... Continue Reading →

Slavery, Freedom and the Jamaican Landscape | British Library – Picturing Places

The link below will take you to an article written by Miles Ogborn, Professor of Geography at Queen Mary University of London. Jamaican Maroons fought two major wars against the British during the 18th century. With reference to maps and views in the King's Topographical Collection, Miles Ogborn investigates this community of escaped slaves and... Continue Reading →

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