Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age: Demystifying Digital History: A Caribbean Perspective

Click this link to see the video (+ slides) of Dr Debbie McCollin’s presentation, ‘Demystifying Digital History.’ Dr McCollin discusses digital history with a focus on the possibilities for scholarship on the Caribbean. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015557/00012

Hélène Huet

carribeanCaribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age is a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.

Please join us for an upcoming event, Demystifying Digital History: A Caribbean Perspective, April 9, 2018, 11am-12pm (Miami Time).

Presenter: Dr. Debbie McCollin

Click here to participate in the online event: https://zoom.us/j/3982941835

About the Presentation:

As History and the Humanities at large came increasingly under threat in the latter 20th and 21st century new avenues were being sought to legitimise and modernise the subject areas to ensure their continuity. The use of the cyberworld, the maximisation of digital technology to support this goal, was seen as the answer to a small cadre of Caribbean scholars. However, with a Caribbean society and…

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Monumental Louverture: French/Haitian Sites of Memory and the Commemoration of Abolition

Another great Caribbean-focused post on the Age of Revolutions Blog.

Age of Revolutions

This post is a part of our “Race and Revolution” series.

By Nathan H. Dize

In May 2017, France celebrated its eleventh day commemorating the Abolition of Slavery. Throughout the Republic, mayors gave speeches and placed wreaths of flowers   before statues and plaques in homage of key figures in the history of abolition.[1] In many cities, this meant honoring Toussaint Louverture, the leader who led his compatriots in the Haitian Revolution until he was arrested, deported, and imprisoned in France from August 1802 until his death in April 1803.  However, the French Republic has done little to recognize the circumstances that led to Louverture’s death on French soil as part of these commemorative celebrations.

Monuments to Louverture often only include mention of the oft-cited “tree of liberty,” his abolitionism, or that he “died in France.” Statues and plaques of Toussaint Louverture in Bordeaux, Grenoble, and in the Château…

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Mellon grant to Emory will help provide new insights on slave trade

Emory has been awarded a $300,000 grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation that will allow researchers at Emory, across the U.S. and abroad to update and expand the renowned website Voyages: The Transatlantic Save Trade Database. Source: Mellon grant to Emory will help provide new insights on slave trade

For Sale: Cuba’s Revolutionary Figured World — Age of Revolutions

By María A. Cabrera Arús Over more than five decades, Cubans have become familiar with a revolutionary iconography constructed, in part, around a sartorial style characterized by olive-drab fatigue uniforms, black military boots, and long, disheveled beards. I have argued elsewhere that this sartorial identity played a determinant role in the construction of an olive-green […]... Continue Reading →

Haiti Links

Haiti has been in the international news this past week, not due to anything of its own making. In the aftermath, historians of Haiti have been very active, taking advantage of the spotlight to get Haiti's story out there, in all its complexity. I've compiled a list of links to some responses to President Trump's... Continue Reading →

Black History Month UK: Links

As Black History Month kicked off in the UK this week, my twitter feed has featured some fascinating research and writing about Britain's black history. I'll update this page as the month progresses with links to articles, historians, writers etc which contribute to getting Britain's black history out in the public domain.   Melissa Bennett,... Continue Reading →

Black History Month in the UK

Black History Month in the United Kingdom runs during October. The 'official' website for the Month has information about the thousands of events planned across the UK. The 'features' tab of the website has many articles about aspects of black history, and opinion pieces. Click here for the Black History Month site. I also noticed... Continue Reading →

Legacies of British Slave-Ownership Website: A Review

Reviews in History has published a review by Dr Daniel Livesay  of the Legacies of British Slave-Ownership website and database. The website was created by a team of researchers at University College London lead by Professor Catherine Hall, and has been live for a few years now.  It details claims for compensation submitted by slave-owners at... Continue Reading →

Manuscripts online at the Beinecke Collection of the Lesser Antilles

I stumbled across this fantastic collection of digitised manuscripts today. The Beinecke Collection is held by the Hamilton College Library. They have digitised hundreds of manuscripts from the 16th-19th century relating to the Lesser Antilles - the documents include maps, correspondence, legal documents and plantation reports. A document which particularly interests me is Grenada's Book... Continue Reading →

Endangered Archives: digitising 19th Century Haitian newspapers

The British Library's Endangered Archives programme contributes to the preservation of archival material that is in danger of destruction, neglect, or physical deterioration world-wide.  In exciting news for historians of Haiti, the Endangered Archives programme has just approved a grant to work with the Bibliothèque Haïtienne des Frères de l’Instruction Chrétienne (BHFIC) in Port-au-Prince to digitise... Continue Reading →

Symposium—Collaborating across the Divide: Digital Humanities and the Caribbean

Repeating Islands

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The symposium “Collaborating across the Divide: Digital Humanities and the Caribbean” will take place September 21-22, 2017, at the University of Florida (in Gainesville, Florida). We’re hoping that folks involved in Caribbean Studies from around the region might be able to attend, with this event both focusing on and being an opportunity for facilitating collaborations. All events are free and open to the public and will take place in the Smathers Library, room 100.

Description: Digital technology has made the early twenty-first century a critical moment of opportunity by providing access to a wide range of library and archival materials and by offering new means of teaching, analyzing content, and presenting literary scholarship. While digital technologies have the promise of bridging institutional and geographic barriers, they have also continued to reproduce colonial hierarchies and marginalize content from the Caribbean and the Global South. This symposium, “Collaborating Across the Divide: Digital…

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