Q&A with Daniel Livesay, author of Children of Uncertain Fortune: Mixed-Race Jamaicans in Britain and the Atlantic Family, 1733-1833

Q&A with Daniel Livesay, author of Children of Uncertain Fortune: Mixed-Race Jamaicans in Britain and the Atlantic Family, 1733-1833 http://earlyamericanists.com/2018/04/20/qa-with-daniel-livesay-author-of-children-of-uncertain-fortune-mixed-race-jamaicans-in-britain-and-the-atlantic-family-1733-1833/ — Read on earlyamericanists.com/2018/04/20/qa-with-daniel-livesay-author-of-children-of-uncertain-fortune-mixed-race-jamaicans-in-britain-and-the-atlantic-family-1733-1833/

Review of the British Museum’s ‘A Revolutionary Legacy: Haiti and Toussaint Louverture’

For those lucky enough to be in London, the British Museum's exhibition on Haiti and Toussaint is on for a couple more weeks. But before you make the trip to the Museum, you might want to read this exhibition review by Tabitha McIntosh, a research student who works on revolutionary Haiti. McIntosh is unimpressed by... Continue Reading →

Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age: Demystifying Digital History: A Caribbean Perspective

Click this link to see the video (+ slides) of Dr Debbie McCollin’s presentation, ‘Demystifying Digital History.’ Dr McCollin discusses digital history with a focus on the possibilities for scholarship on the Caribbean. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015557/00012

Hélène Huet

carribeanCaribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age is a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.

Please join us for an upcoming event, Demystifying Digital History: A Caribbean Perspective, April 9, 2018, 11am-12pm (Miami Time).

Presenter: Dr. Debbie McCollin

Click here to participate in the online event: https://zoom.us/j/3982941835

About the Presentation:

As History and the Humanities at large came increasingly under threat in the latter 20th and 21st century new avenues were being sought to legitimise and modernise the subject areas to ensure their continuity. The use of the cyberworld, the maximisation of digital technology to support this goal, was seen as the answer to a small cadre of Caribbean scholars. However, with a Caribbean society and…

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Monumental Louverture: French/Haitian Sites of Memory and the Commemoration of Abolition

Another great Caribbean-focused post on the Age of Revolutions Blog.

Age of Revolutions

This post is a part of our “Race and Revolution” series.

By Nathan H. Dize

In May 2017, France celebrated its eleventh day commemorating the Abolition of Slavery. Throughout the Republic, mayors gave speeches and placed wreaths of flowers   before statues and plaques in homage of key figures in the history of abolition.[1] In many cities, this meant honoring Toussaint Louverture, the leader who led his compatriots in the Haitian Revolution until he was arrested, deported, and imprisoned in France from August 1802 until his death in April 1803.  However, the French Republic has done little to recognize the circumstances that led to Louverture’s death on French soil as part of these commemorative celebrations.

Monuments to Louverture often only include mention of the oft-cited “tree of liberty,” his abolitionism, or that he “died in France.” Statues and plaques of Toussaint Louverture in Bordeaux, Grenoble, and in the Château…

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CFP: ‘Co-dependent Empires’: 2nd Annual Conference of Imperial Entanglements: Trans-Oceanic Basque Networks in British and Spanish Colonialism and their Legacy — Imperial Entanglements

13-14 July 2018, Museo Histórico de Acapulco ‘Fuerte de San Diego’, Acapulco, Mexico Conference Theme: The historiography on empires and imperial rivalries is abundant. The stories of the rise and fall of Rome, Carthage, Persia, Byzantium, Portugal, Spain, France, Britain, etc., are all well worn territory for a variety of historians. Empires have been compared […]... Continue Reading →

A letter from Mary Williamson to her former owner: History Workshop

History Workshop has published an 1809 letter written by a formerly enslaved woman, Mary Williamson, to her former owner in Jamaica. I know from my own research that uncovering the voices of women in the Caribbean past is extremely difficult, and it is even more so when it comes to enslaved women. Take a look... Continue Reading →

Mellon grant to Emory will help provide new insights on slave trade

Emory has been awarded a $300,000 grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation that will allow researchers at Emory, across the U.S. and abroad to update and expand the renowned website Voyages: The Transatlantic Save Trade Database. Source: Mellon grant to Emory will help provide new insights on slave trade

More Free Classics Now Available in Open Books Series

The Florida Bookshelf

Library-Press_blue

The LibraryPress@UF, an imprint of the University of Florida Press and the University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries, launched the Florida and the Caribbean Open Books Series this past November. This series makes available for free 39 classic out of print books on the region under an Open Access model. It is funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation as part of the Humanities Open Book Program.

The final 18 titles in the series are now available:

Afro-Cuban Religious Experience: Cultural Reflections in Narrative
Eugenio Matibag

The African American Heritage of Florida
Edited by David R. Colburn and Jane L. Landers

Archaeology of Precolumbian Florida
Jerald T. Milanich

The Architecture of Leisure: The Florida Resort Hotels of Henry Flagler and Henry Plant
Susan R. Braden

The Dutch in the Caribbean and on the Wild Coast, 1580–1680
Cornelis Ch. Goslinga

Eighteenth-Century Florida…

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Research Trajectory #5: The Natural History Collections of Bermuda

empire trees climate

Using Natural History Specimens in Interdisciplinary Research on Past Ecologies

Kirsten Greer

I am the Canada Research Chair in Global Environmental Histories and Geographies and am interested in how we can use historical natural history specimens (e.g. birds, plants, rocks) as cultural artifacts to examine global environmental change from an interdisciplinary perspective. Over the last decade, there has been a growing body of work recognizing the value of historical natural history specimens as valuable sources of data in global environmental change. Many of these specimens date back to over 150 years ago, and provide insight into environmental change over time when examined with contemporary records.

However, as critical scholars have emphasized, such historical natural history materials reflect not just simple representations of reality but were entangled in systems of knowledge and power in varying places and times. For example, a number of natural history collections in British museums connect to…

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For Sale: Cuba’s Revolutionary Figured World — Age of Revolutions

By María A. Cabrera Arús Over more than five decades, Cubans have become familiar with a revolutionary iconography constructed, in part, around a sartorial style characterized by olive-drab fatigue uniforms, black military boots, and long, disheveled beards. I have argued elsewhere that this sartorial identity played a determinant role in the construction of an olive-green […]... Continue Reading →

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